Me and my new Job!


It’s been a couple of months since I’ve last blogged. For those who have been following my updates, you’ve probably noticed that I’ve just embarked on an exciting new journey with Johnson & Johnson.

As with every new employee, I’ve developed an insatiable appetite to learn everything about the organization that I’ve just joined.

I am delighted to come across a very interesting article on Business Insider today “The 30 most meaningful companies to work for in America” mentioning Johnson & Johnson as one of the top 30 most meaningful company to work for in 2015, adding on to the long list of positive feedback from the many people who have congratulated me on my new gig.

Looking back on my personal experience over the last couple of months as Johnson & Johnson and I come to a decision that we are suitable for each other, I was pleasantly surprised by the amount emphasis that I’ve placed on aligning my personal values against that of Johnson & Johnson’s. I was trying to make sure that I do find meaning in work.

I’ve always taken a practical approach when advising people on their careers, thus a move to a different industry is something that I tend to be extra careful about. Thus, as soon as I send in my application for the role, I started to do my research on Johnson & Johnson.

The one thing that really impresses me is Johnson & Johnson’s credo. Our Credo challenges us to put the needs and well-being of the people we serve first. I remember feeling a strong sense of purpose and pride as I see myself being part of this amazing organization.

The next thing I looked at was the role itself. It is important for me to be able to do well in my new role. Thus I was determined to make sure that I not only be able to meet the expectations that comes with the job, but to exceed that expectation!

Last but not least, it is the people that make up the organization. Through the interactions with the different interviews, I got a good sense of the culture and working style. It is important to know if you’ll fit in with the rest of the folks.
Summing up, what’s been really important for me in coming to a decision was:

  1. Do my personal and organization values align?
  2. Can I do the job?
  3. Will I fit in?

I guess every one of us would have gone through or is going through the same thought process as we look to embark on a new journey, and I wish all those who are in midst of considering a new role the best.

For me, it’s been about 7 weeks since I’ve been on the job. It’s been a wonderful start to my new and career with Johnson & Johnson, and I look forward to a long and meaningful relationship with my new employer.

Cheers
Eric

Opinions expressed are solely my own and do not express the views or opinions of my employer.

Eric Wong is ASEAN Talent Acquisition Leader at Johnson & Johnson. His experience spans across the various human resource functions such as HR Information Systems, Business Partnering and Talent Management. Eric currently sits on the Advisory Board of the Management Development Institute of Singapore (MDIS). Connect with him on Linkedin or follow him on Twitter @ErickyWong.

Visit us @ our career sites today:
JnJ Career site | Indonesia | Malaysia | Philippines | Singapore | Thailand | Vietnam

Advertisements

So, you got called for an interview… What’s next?


It’s the start of the New Year and here’s my first blog article to kick it off!

A couple of friends I spoke with told me that they’ve made it their New Year’s resolution to look for a new job!

Interestingly, companies experience the highest level of attrition during this in Q1. This is usually after the bonus or annual wage supplement (AWS) payout in December. In countries where the Chinese Lunar New Year is celebrated, the attrition numbers usually peak just after the festive season.

This usually translates to hiring in late Q1 and early Q2 for most companies.

It is always flattering to receive some love and attention from recruiters (or headhunters as we like to call them).

So, you got approached for an opportunity, or even been invited to attend an exploratory interview… What’s next?

That’s quite a foolish question isn’t it? The answer is simply a “Yes, let’s explore”, or “No, I’m not interested at this point of time”.

Let’s just assume it’s a decent opportunity and you are slightly tempted, or the call could be an outcome of your recent application… What’s next?

You would agree with me that the next most important thing to do is to prepare! Here goes…

The recruiter (or the person who’s reached out to you)

Most of us are contacted by someone from the recruitment team, or someone who’s hiring for their own team/ department. This is one of the best sources of information. Always try to get as much information as possible. They may or may not have the information, but there’s no harm trying.

Don’t be put off by if they may sound a bit rushed to setup the interview and have little time fill you in on the role. If you are a strong fit for the role, they need you more than you need them.

You can try asking for the following:

  • Job Description (JD)
  • The process and who’s on the panel of interviewers
  • What are some of the things they’re looking for, or challenges that they are looking to solve with this hire

The Company

Always check up the company. Even if you know the company well, don’t be complacent. They might have evolved through growth, acquisition or mergers. A couple good places to start are:

The panel and people

Professional social networking sites such as Linkedin had made it so convenient for us to look up profiles of employees in any given organization. (You might want to explore getting a premium account with Linkedin – There should be a trial account available)

Where possible, I would always advice candidates to take a look at the panel of interviewers that they will be meeting with.

The panel of interviewers is usually made up of the hiring manager and key stake holders or people that the role would have to interact with.

This would give you a better understanding of who they are and what they do. Plan your interview with questions that relates to the interviewer’s role. Remember, as much as the company’s sizing you up as a candidate, you need to also get a feel of the people that you will be working with. More importantly, if you would be comfortable with working with them.

Another thing I that I would look at would be the employees, both current and past. Look out for the length of tenure as this will give you an idea of the level of attrition. More importantly, this will give you an idea of where the company is hiring from and losing talents to.

The grass is greener on the other side, because …

You’re standing in the shade my friend!

As much as it is exciting to think about that new opportunity, don’t get carried away with the unknown. A lot of people I know took the plunge and ended up regretting their decision.

As many of us get into the momentum of work in our current organization, we often find it hard to expand and take on a larger portfolio or try something new. Thus, that created the illusion that career development opportunities are absent in our own organizations.

Is this the fault of the company or employees? We can argue this both ways. It could be us and our own comfort zones (the shade), or it could be a genuine lack of opportunities.

Always take a step back and evaluate your current company alongside the new opportunity. Look at the “Employer Value Proposition” – EVP (I’ll probably do a separate blog article at a later date on this).

Candidates want to join organization that present a strong value proposition. Some basic factors to consider are:

  • Company’s branding and market position
  • Developmental opportunities
  • Total Rewards – Compensation and benefits
  • Culture

So, don’t get too excited about the new opportunity and take care in evaluating the options.

Last but not least, do share your thoughts about any other tips we should keep in mind when approaching that new opportunity!

Happy interviewing and best of luck in 2015!

Cheers

Eric

Eric Wong is Head of Talent Acquisition & Development (APAC) at Polycom, and blogs about how video collaboration can benefit the HR function on Polycom’s “The View from APAC”. Connect with him on Linkedin or follow him on Twitter@ErickyWong.